Why Should You Broadcast Your Class Live? Parents, Students, Admin, You! -http://wp.me/p17e1J-6o

Broadcast your class live every day, every period, all day. Benefit #1 – Parents can tune in and see what their child is doing. Benefit #2 – Students who are sick at home can still learn while laying in bed, assuming they are not too sick to do so. Benefit #3 – Most broadcasting tools will simultaneously record thus providing a video archive of class events, class activities, quality of instruction, a chance to review and reflect on your own teaching methods, plus also provide the context behind class disruptions and distractions.

By the time you are done reading this you will likely have generated your own thoughts or list of benefits for broadcasting and recording class live. Please share in the comments below.

To be upfront about things, very few parents have actually watched class live. I would love if more parents would embrace the opportunity but I also realize people are busy and may not have the tech to do so. Nonetheless I still feel it is important to provide the service.

The first concern most educators have is privacy issues of students. The second concern is whether parents will allow their students to be on video. Lastly, will admin allow live video in the classroom.

Hopefully my answers to these concerns will ease your mind and bring confidence to your live broadcast pursuit. The truth is all three concerns can be answered easily. It is all about the parents. The admin I have worked with have been supportive of the things I want to do as longs as parents are on board. When I first started broadcasting I sent home a form for parents to read and sign. Basically the form asked permission to share the students image publicly. It also asked permission to share video of students working in class or participating in school events. Most parents signed the form and sent it back with students. If parents would not sign the form or indicated they did not want their child on video then I would position the student off camera. It is true that audio of the student might make it into the video and that class activities might bring the student into view temporarily. Parents realize this is the case and have been very understanding. Currently the district I teach in has an acceptable use policy which covers my classroom needs. In addition to that I have adopted an opt-out plan. Handouts go home, emails are sent, and unless I hear otherwise students will be on video. Video quality of my broadcasts also helps to add a small level of privacy. Check the video below. I have considered finding ways to add a password to the broadcast to help maintain privacy but that would make it less likely parents, students, and admin will actually check out the class. When people walk into my room I tell them to be aware that there is a live video feed and they are on camera. Most people do not mind. The ones who do mind do not stay in my room long or pretend it does not bother them.

Validity of broadcasting live doubled for me when we had a class activity and I reminded the students the video was live. Students asked if they could text the link to parents. A few parents tuned in and were actually texting back to the student and responding to some of the questions we were asking. This had been one of my goals from day one. Needless to say I was thrilled.

Broadcasting can also be used to share what is happening in your class with other parts of the school, city, state…… Last year I occasionally emailed teachers a link to the live feed so other classes would be able to watch us feed the class snakes. We have had guest speakers and video chats where other classes participated from different rooms (Google Hangouts On Air can also work as a video conference tool like skype but with Google 10 different people/classrooms can join the discussion). Some schools have used live broadcasting to share athletic events, band concerts, and poetry readings with the public. Imagine the family of a student in another part of the world tuning in to see their grandson graduate from high school. Or a father or mother serving in the military watch their child perform in the school play.

If the fun side of broadcasting class did not get you, then maybe the practical side will. -When are you being recorded on video? If you are a teacher you must assume you are always being recorded. Whether it is in the halls at school by the security cameras or in the classroom with sneaky students and their cell phones. Some teachers try to maintain an extreme level of control over device use in the class. I feel appropriate use of electronics in class is important, but it is tough to monitor everything all the time. Frankly, that type of vigilance can make a teacher go crazy and cultivate a level of mistrust between students and the teacher.

The why should I broadcast class – the “cover your butt,” side of the argument.

  • Most video recordings do not cause problems for people unless they are viewed out of  context. If you live broadcast and record your class then you have the whole context of the event or activity that might be called into question.
  • If a student claims to have been bullied or mistreated by another student you can look at the video later and see what happened.
  • Thefts can be solved as well. We were able to get a students ipod returned to them because of the video recording.
  • It is important that we stay professionals, but if you lose it for a moment or two, you will have evidence behind the outburst.
  • On the other hand, if you behave in a way that is questionable, there is video proof of the misstep. You will need to be willing to accept the consequences for things you do wrong.

It is important to keep in mind that the video doesn’t catch everything. You will need to decide when you think using the video “as proof” is necessary compared to when it is not. Just because one student threw a piece of paper does not mean you need to watch 30 min of video to catch the culprit.

Nuts and Bolts

There are a couple streaming services available to broadcast your class. I have used Ustream and LiveStream. Currently I use Google Hangouts On Air. A $20-30 USB webcamera from your local store and a Gmail/Google+ account. The quality of the video will not be the best but it will be enough to provide a decent service depending on your needs. Google Hangouts On Air automatically saves the video to your youtube channel. This is great because you can then organize playlists to post on your class website. “But I don’t want my students on youtube!” You can change the setting of videos to “unlisted” which will make the video unsearchable through youtube or google. However if you share the link to the individual video it will be viewable to anyone who has the link.

When you start a Google Hangout On Air, the live feed can be found on your Youtube channel. So on the homepage of my class website I have a link that takes viewers to my Youtube page. There they will be able to click the “live” feed.

demo for blog

 

To wrap up, there are lots of reasons you should live broadcast your class. Overcoming your fears of problems might be the only thing that is standing in your way. From my experience the benefits far out weigh the problems. If you need help getting started, I’m here. :)

If you have questions or comments I would love to hear them. Thanks!

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New Plans for #SciStuChat (http://wp.me/p17e1J-6j)

Hey all. It has been a good break but this Thursday we are ready to get a new school year of discussions between Scientists and High School Students started. At 9 pm EDT Thursday, Sept. 11 we will discuss the Nature of Science. I regret the date turns out to be 9/11, however, participating in a Twitter chat with no boarders is one of the great things about living free. Freedom comes with a cost and I am grateful for those how have sacrificed for me and my family. Each year scientists and students from more and more countries join the monthly chat and I am thrilled by the growth. As weird as it sounds I hope the power and freedom of social media will be available to all people in every country in the near future.

This year we will be making a strong effort to hit topics that have far reaching interest across multiple science disciplines. Through this push we hope that more teachers will find value in participation with their students. We also plan to work hard to provide a higher volume of resources as classes prepare for discussions. This is not to say that pre-chat-prep is required. We will still follow the basic format that has been adopted by so many Twitter chats with the Q1/A1 question and answer response. Student moderators will still lead the discussion and they will begin preparation for the chat well in advance.

During the discussions we would like to try to run a Google Hangout On Air for the student moderators and their cooperating teachers.  We thought this would help increase the quality of communication between the educators and students as they lead #SciStuChat.

We are also working to build a more aesthetically pleasing website. The bare-bones of the old site has served us well but we feel it is time for a change. The new site will not be ready by Thursday, however.

All high school science teachers, all high school students, all scientists, science writers, and all science minded individuals are welcome to join in. Hope to see you on the hashtag. 

Teachers planning to have students participate??? Please, teach them the methods for participation.

If you want to learn more about the details behind #SciStuChat, check out sg.sg/scistuchat1 

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Vine, Instagram, Twitter… Oh My! It is not about the app, it is about the ways students can demonstrate learning with the app

“There isn’t a ‘PG’ rated app that an educator can’t turn into a learning tool” – ZALT

I wish I was able to remember how I was first introduced to @VineApp – a smartphone app that allows users to make and view 6 second videos. What can you do in 6 sec?  A lot. Video clips can be in the form of stop animation by tapping on the recording screen to capture short spurts. ie. Pinecone.

When I first made my vine account I was quick to find the GE #6secondscience competition. Students used vine to show science in 6 seconds. I was thrilled. Finally a video tool that fit my attention span and that of my students! Plus it was an app available to iPhone, iPod Touch, and Android users. Half of my students if not more have a device of some kind so using Vine in class would be easy!

The complexity of the #6secondscience videos has been varied. Some were simple others were a lot more complex complex.

Not long after that I met a new tweep Tricia Shelton, @TdiShelton. She said she had started using Instagram in class with her students. A few students were begging me to start using Instagram in class as well. Sadly I didn’t succumb to the suggestions/requests till second semester. The app can take pictures as well as make 15 second videos. Part of the reason I finally signed up for Instagram is the result of a cool web app I discovered. tagboard.com. Many of you are likely already familiar with it. If it is new to you, you are in for a treat. Tagboard can compile hashtags across several social media platforms: Vine, Instagram, Twitter, Google+, and Facebook. This ability opens up a new world for teachers. We now have one tool to compile education sharing from different platforms just by using one hashtag. This is great for students as well, they can choose which app they want to use. Tricia and I use #kytnsci to help our students share their learning. Here is the link to the tagboard.  https://tagboard.com/kytnsci/155008 you will likely need to scroll down a few times before you find student posts, but they are there!

The more videos we make the more complex the videos become. Currently, students are required to do more than just a demo. Students must also include a description and summary of the demonstration.

On May 2nd a discussion started about using Vine for education. Here is the record of the discussion. https://storify.com/2footgiraffe/shareured#publicize – a summary? We want to share student learning with other students through Vine and other video tools.

So it all comes down to this, if you and your students are using social media (Instagram, Vine, Twitter, etc) to demonstrate learning, please include the hashtag #ShareUrEd – we are hoping this can turn into a location that students can share cool developments in their educational growth.

 

I said it wasn’t about the app, it is about the learning, but I failed to give more examples. – a fix is coming soon.

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I am Smiling Big! —(http://wp.me/p17e1J-5y)

Smile

Part 1

As you can see, I am smiling! For those who follow me on Twitter, you likely already know why.

TWITTER WAS UNBLOCKED IN MY DISTRICT in the early part of March.

Connecting students with scientists or other professionals is one of my primary goals. Most of my students will not grow-up to be scientists or science teachers but they might remember real discussions we had with real scientists through social media.

Twitter is the easiest way to get student connected with the outside world. Student blogs are nice but in order for the student to feel validated you have to find people to read and comment on every students post. Skyping is nice as well but it can be taxing to get 30 students to pay attention to one person. It is difficult enough to get them to listen to me and I’m in the room. I realize blogs and video chat tools have their place but Twitter is so much easier.

Once students have Twitter accounts, they can help find professionals. Searching Google is a great option. Ex. Scientists on Twitter, Engineers on twitter. Better yet is to use Twitter itself. Using a keyword or hashtag in the Twitter search bar can bring all sorts of awesome information. ex. #genetics #genomics #astronomy #nebula #crossstitch #carpentry. Next, students introduce themselves to the professionals and ask a question. Discussions can be organized where a specific list of professionals will chat with students using a common hashtag etc.

So besides the potential of what I listed above, why is my excitement through the roof? Since 2009 there have been backdoor methods for getting to Twitter. These methods leave many parts of the social media tool functionless. I did not complain about our problems and the district did not call-me-out for helping students get to a blocked site. Leadership knew students in my class used Twitter for learning and not for other questionable purposes. In fact news stations had come to my class to see how we were utilizing a tool that most people use for finding what celebrities had for breakfast.

Long story short (for this particular section). If Twitter is unblocked, students will have access to making Twitter lists, feeds will update faster, links will be viewable, clicking through a person’s followers will be possible. All these features that we have grown to love, raise the quality and quantity of interactions. So, increase the effectiveness by increased versatility and speed of access? YES PLEASE!

Part 2

What was the process to get to this point?

I began using Twitter as a result of attendance at a Foreign Language conference in TN. One of the sessions was led by Amy Kelly-Graham aka @TNschatz – Her session focused on different web apps, sites, and tools to integrate technology within a foreign language classroom. One of those apps was Twitter. I, like most people was doubtful Twitter could provide any meaningful use in class. She quickly convinced the rest of us and I made an account later that night. Wide-eyed, ignorant, and excited, I had my students make accounts the next week. We had fun but it was not very productive. However I was fortunate to have an executive principal who was fully supportive and saw the potential in what I was trying to accomplish.

After some reflection, time, and input from Amy and other Twitter educators we made better use of our time on twitter.  Over the next three years I invited (the invite process http://wp.me/s17e1J-208) state education leaders, school district leaders, school board members, State Senators and Congressmen to come and see what we were doing.  The feedback was all positive. (Reporting back about the invite http://wp.me/p17e1J-3v) Some of those who made the visit began advocating for opening Twitter in the district. In fact some had already been working to open Youtube and Twitter prior to the visit. A student and I made a visit to the school board to plead our case. I requested help from the Twitter community as well http://wp.me/p17e1J-3Q. Here is the follow up after the trip to the school board http://wp.me/p17e1J-43.

The first visit to the Board was triggered after our last workaround to get on Twitter was disabled. After I had made my plea to the board to allow Twitter in our school system, the districts Operating Officer approached me and said he did not know that there had been a change to block our last backdoor into twitter. By the time I left the meeting and through a fury of emails the Operating Officer had discovered that the internet safety company the district and most of the state uses, had made the change. The company makes decisions about what to block or not based on a committee of Tennessee educators, principals, and others. In the spring of 2013 the committee decided that Twitter should be blacklisted, thus blocking all access even with an override code.

By the middle of the summer several district leadership were doing all they could to help our schools gain access to social media like Twitter and Youtube. In the fall they allowed me to pilot a program that would give my students access to both. Twitter access however was only through the mobile Twitter app run on a laptop which was great but a bit like trying to type with one and a half fingers. Some leaders including the director of Learning Technologies (also the president of ISTE), the Chief Academic Officer and even the Director of Schools were pushing hard to open things for us. Others leaders were concerned, and rightfully so, about students safety, CIPA laws, and maintaining ERate funding. ERate are federal funds that helped the district bring in WIFI to many of our schools.

In an effort to help eliminate some of these concerns I put out a call on twitter to find schools or districts who have ERate funds and still have Twitter and Youtube open to their students. Many responded and began emailing me and leadership information and data in support of using social media in schools. Eventually concerns were satisfied and some policies were rewritten to accommodate the planned change.

Finally we had one last obstacle. We needed to host a public hearing for parents and other stakeholders to come and voice their concerns. The meeting was well publicized. The four local news stations showed up to record and broadcast. Surprisingly, not one parent came to protest. I was the only person there who was not a member of district leadership or a television crew. You should have seen the look on the faces of those worried about the public’s push back. The relief was huge for all of us. In fact two of the major proponents of the change did not show up to the meeting because that wanted to the world to know that this change had been made at the request of teachers like me. A day and a half later, my students were on Twitter without any limitations. This all went down a week and a half ago and I am still on a High from whole thing.

This is what the news stations ended up sharing when no parents showed up to protest. The report from Fox17 http://bit.ly/1fQsDUO

The report from NewsChannel5 

Are there still safety concerns for students, yes! Will students need to be trained in proper social media behavior, yes! That is part of the reason social media needs to be open in education. If we want to teach students how to be good digital citizens then we need to allow them the chance to be good digital citizens! -

I have deliberately left specific names out of this blog post. There have been many many people who have helped make this happen. I do not want to leave anyone out. All I can say is Thank You to everyone who contributed to making this change! You know who you are! I hope this summary is accurate. There was more going on behinds the scene that I did not know about.

Hmm let’s see, what do we need to do next?………

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Outreach through Science Conferences

Thanks to Twitter and the scientists I follow, connecting to science conferences is easier than ever. In fact many conferences would be unknown to the public accept through Twitter. Thankfully, many scientists are embracing social media and are live tweeting the events. Connectedness is changing the face of science communication.

In addition to helping more scientists join the Twitterverse there is more outreach that can be done to increase public awareness of science and science conferences. It is as simple as live broadcasting conference proceedings. This can be done relatively cheaply and without much effort.

If a professional crew is hired the cost can be staggering when coupled with the cost of quality internet. However, cost of broadcasting can be cheap and decent quality. Google Hangouts On Air is free. If you have a gmail account then you have access to the service. Many scientists and science communicators already use GHO On Air to host discussions and events like “Virtual StarParties”

- Although GHO On Air is designed for face to face discussion, it can be used as a broadcast tool as well. with a low quality camera you can see my class. (Students and parents have signed concent forms)

A second deterrent has been privacy and freedom of session discussions. It is important for presenters to be able to share data without losing priority for scientific discoveries. Sharing unpublished data is common at science conferences. It is also possible attendees may feel less willing to share their own ideas and criticisms if sessions are being broadcast and recorded.

However, having just one room dedicated to presentations that can be broadcast live and recorded would be simple to organize. Potential presenters would indicate on the session proposal application whether or not they are willing to have their presentations live on the internet. Presenters who agree to being broadcast can then be assigned to the “live room.”

The final concern for conference organizers might be, “if people can just watch online, why would they come in person?” Attending things live and in person is the preference for most people.  Political affiliations aside, would you rather watch the President of the United States on TV or in person. Those who have the means will still attend conferences. Those who do not have the means can watch online and spread the word to others in the public.

So if you are organizing a scientific conference or any type of conference, please, strongly consider making sessions available online for public consumption.

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The Easiest Out-Reach You Will Ever Do.

Outreach is easy right? Actually, it can be. Most financial advisors will encourage individuals to diversify their portfolio. So why not diversify your scientific outreach? Many scientists already do.

So what are you doing the 2nd Thursday of each month at 9pm Eastern?. Once a month scientists and high school students gather together on Twitter and use the hashtag #SciStuChat (scientists student chat) to talk science.

#SciStuChat has been around for two years now and we are constantly looking for more scientists, science writers, and thinkers to engage the high school students. Topics are decided by the student participants. During the past twenty-four months we have covered topics ranging from black holes, evolution, genetic engineering, shark misconceptions and conservation, cloning, and many others. We usually have two student moderators who are responsible for welcoming those who join the chat and developing 7-10 questions about the chosen topic to be asked during the discussion. Here is a short tutorial about the format and participation for #SciStuChat.

The purpose behind our monthly chat is to give students a chance to talk to real scientists as well as learn about pressing science topics in the world. Many students never get the chance to meet a scientists and as a result they are dependant on the stereotypes they see in the media. As you know scientists are a diverse bunch, not all wear lab coats, glasses, or pocket protectors. Some scientists enjoy skydiving, ultimate frisbee, arguing about sports, or watching The Walking Dead.  So whatever you are doing for science outreach, continue your efforts, but please join us once a month for an invigorating discussion with high school students and other scientists. Even if you are not an expert in a particular field, we need science thinkers.  If you have already joined in the past, Thank You, and I hope we will see you again in the future.

For more information about #SciStuChat, check out the website sg.sg/scistuchat1. Here is some good press we have received in the past couple years.

Stereotypes you can help break as suggested by scientists

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#WeirdSci Part 2: #WeirdInverts (http://wp.me/p17e1J-56)

Last month we had fun with #WeirdSci and #WeirdBugs. Check out the storify of last months #weirdsci. http://storify.com/2footgiraffe/weirdsci-week-weirdbugs

This month we are checkin-out #WeirdInverts. We need a couple definitions though. By inverts of course we mean invertebrates or animals without a backbone.
The awesome pictures were provided by John S. Mead. Click the pic to visit his site. Thanks John!
Atlantic Nettle

The “weird” part of #WeirdInverts needs more detail for the definition. For the purposes of this activity weird = cool, unusual, awesome, crazy, scary, beautiful, amazing, ugly (no animal is ugly in my opinion), creepy, and any other adjective that come to mind. Basically, post pictures, videos, and drawings of inverts you find interesting. Please credit the photographer when possible.

#WeirdInverts participation runs on Feb 1st and 2nd. However, you are welcome to post weird inverts anytime before or after. :)

Share your #WeirdInverts stuff through Twitter, Instagram, and Vine. Just make sure you include the #WEIRDINVERTS hashtag (Casing does not matter, upper or lower, it’s all good.)

Happy Posting

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